Cruise ship accidents may be difficult to litigate

Sailing the open seas on a commercial cruise line is a popular choice for vacationers. However, Florida residents who enjoy cruises may want to take note of recent information published in an article that lists potential issues regarding cruise ship accidents. Several people injured while on cruises have reportedly been shocked to learn that filing legal claims in court did not come as easily as they would have expected when accidents occurred during their cruises.

The recent article cautions commercial cruise passengers to carefully read all the fine print on their contracts, especially in regard to provisions pertaining to catastrophic injury or death. Several clauses were mentioned that might alarm potential travelers. One of these involved a limitation on the amount in damages that can be sought in a claim against a cruise line.

According to the data, international itineraries often list a cap of about $70,000 on the amount of compensation a passenger may seek in a legal claim. In addition, some commercial cruise lines mandate specific courts for the filing of any suits against them. The article noted that many passengers who were involved in the Costa Concordia incident were shocked to learn that they were required to file any and all legal claims in Italy even though they were American citizens and had purchased their tickets in the United States.

Florida residents who were injured while on cruises or family members who lost loved ones to cruise ship accidents may find the help of legal professionals to be necessary when filing claims. Any number of roadblocks may present themselves during the process, including a short statute of limitations, making seeking legal help as soon as possible after an accident important. Regardless of the complexity of a case, an experienced personal injury attorney will have the experience to assist a victim or a victim’s family with the claims process.

Source: Miami Herald, “Watch out for the fine print“, Carol Finklehoffe and Robert Peltz, March 9, 2015