The importance of nail gun safety at the workplace

Nail guns represent a leading cause of injury at construction and other types of work sites. Florida workers may be wise to have an understanding of how nail gun injuries occur and how to prevent them when at work. OSHA provides important guidelines detailing these types of injuries.

Injuries are most common when the user is attempting to nail an object from an awkward position, such as when they are reaching from a ladder, toe nailing, or forced to use their non-dominant hand for the job. Close quarters jobs, where the gun’s recoil is more difficult to control, also tend to result in more injuries. The best practice is to plan the approach to a job so that these situations are avoided as much as possible. Nails that become airborne projectiles are also a leading cause of injury. Airborne nails are often the result of missing the intended piece or of full penetration. Finally, any tampering with the nail gun’s inherent safety features greatly increases the risk of injury.

Different nail guns are prone to different types of injury. Contact trigger nail guns tend to have a slightly higher injury risk than other types of guns because in addition to the standard causes of injury, contact triggers pose additional risks. A common risk associated with these guns is their preponderance to double fire or to fire unintentionally.

When construction accidents do occur involving nail guns, the injured worker has the important choice between filing a compensation claim or a lawsuit. Filing for workers’ compensation benefits may assist a worker with medical bills and any loss of work as they heal. Should issues arise, a lawyer might be able to offer their assistance.