Construction workers face high rate of injury

In Florida and throughout the country, construction workers are at a higher risk for job-related injuries than people working in most other occupations. In 2012, the construction industry had the seventh highest rate of injury with 382 per every 10,000 workers facing non-fatal injuries that caused them to miss work for three days or more. With the growth of the construction industry, more workers injured in construction accidents means a greater number of workers’ compensation claims in the construction industry.

Out of all of the job-related fatalities in the United States, over 19 percent of the injuries occurred in the construction industry. Different types of hazardous behavior, including falling, being hit by an object, getting electrocuted and becoming stuck in a dangerous space, can result in deaths in the construction industry. Falls also accounted for the largest number of injuries and illnesses in the industry and resulted in average workers’ compensation claims of more than $50,000.

Examining injury and fatality trends in the construction industry can help workers, supervisors and business owners to better understand what they need to do to create a safer workplace. Having this information can allow them to create environments and take actions that prevent a construction site or crane accident, scaffolding or ladder fail or another type of common incident in the construction industry.

Workers in the construction industry in Florida have 30 days from the time of an injury to report a workplace incident to their employers. Employers are required to provide medical care, in the form of a doctor’s or hospital visit, physical therapy or testing, through their insurance company and report workers’ claims to the state’s Division of Workers’ Compensation within 24 hours of an injury or death.

SourceFindLaw, “Construction Safety: The Industry at a Glance“, November 10, 2014