Continental Tire to pay woman $10 million for defective products

When we buy a new car and service it on schedule, we expect that the car will get us from one destination to another safely. We especially depend on the tires, which could cause a serious accident if not rotated and replaced according to the maintenance schedule. One Florida suffered catastrophic injuries after the tread on her tires separated while driving on the highway. She was recently awarded $10 million in damages from the tire’s manufacturer, Continental Tire the Americas L.L.C.

The woman bought her car, a Chevrolet Cobalt, from a local dealer in 2006. The car came with Continental Contact tires. The woman took her car to Walmart to be serviced on schedule.

Three years later, in May 2009, the woman was driving in Stuart, Florida, along I-95 when the tread separated from one of the tires. The car rolled over multiple times and the woman suffered from seriously personal injuries.

Continental Tires was recently ordered by the 15th Judicial Circuit of Palm Beach County to pay the woman $10 million in damages. The woman sued on behalf of herself, her husband and three sons. She had originally filed a lawsuit against the Chevrolet dealer, Walmart and Continental Tires. The woman claimed that the tire on her car was defective and that Continental Tires was negligent during the design, testing and manufacturing processes. The company denies these allegations.

Defective products can cause serious injuries, disability or even death to a consumer. Although accidents happen, it is up to the manufacturers to be thorough in their testing and inspection processes prior to sale. They have a duty to keep consumers safe.

Those injured by defective products have legal rights. Injured consumers face financial challenges after such an accident. Fortunately, they could potentially receive compensation for medical bills, lost wages, disfigurement, disability and other damages.

Source
RubberNews.com, “Continental ordered to pay $10 million in Fla. product liability case” No author given, Oct. 08, 2013